Today marks the 57th year since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was proclaimed. Although many countries in the world today observe the principles set forth in the UDHR, regrettably China as a member of the UN Security Council and the international community, has failed to respect the principles set therein.

In March 2004, China made a historic amendment to its Constitution by adding the clause “The State respects and safeguards human rights”. However, the amendment fell short of details, leaving the interpretation of the term “human rights” open and ambiguous. After almost two years of the amendment, there are no explicit signs of respect for human rights and any improvement in the human rights situation in China and Tibet. In 2005, the human rights situation in Chinese occupied Tibet remains to be tense and grim. Throughout the year, the Dharamsala-based Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) has received consistent reports of human rights concerns.

Continue Reading

Today marks the 57th year since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was proclaimed. Although many countries in the world today observe the principles set forth in the UDHR, regrettably China as a member of the UN Security Council and the international community, has failed to respect the principles set therein.

In March 2004, China made a historic amendment to its Constitution by adding the clause “The State respects and safeguards human rights”. However, the amendment fell short of details, leaving the interpretation of the term “human rights” open and ambiguous. After almost two years of the amendment, there are no explicit signs of respect for human rights and any improvement in the human rights situation in China and Tibet. 

Continue Reading

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) welcomes the UN Special Rapporteur’s forthcoming visit to Tibet and China from 21 November to 2 December 2005. The Centre strongly supports and attaches great importance to the much awaited visit by the expert in order to gain first hand information of the true picture of the torture situation in Tibet and China.

On the eve of the visit, TCHRD urges the UN expert to investigate the widespread and systematic use of torture within Tibet’s prison, detention centres, labour camps and other detention facilities. The Centre pleads the expert to especially investigate the treatment of political prisoners since cases of extreme torture against them are often reported.

Continue Reading

The People’s Republic of China recommenced implementation of the “patriotic education” campaign in monastic institutions in Tibet, according to testimonies received from Tibetan monks who fled into exile.

There has been a noted rise in the intensity of the campaign, which is being carried out vigorously in the monastic institutions in and around Lhasa City, “Tibet Autonomous Region” (‘TAR’). Monks who fled Tibet in the aftermath of the campaign reported expulsions of monks from their monasteries.

Three young Tibetan monks, who escaped from Tibet in September 2005, reported conduct of “patriotic education” in June 2005 in their monastery, Talung Monastery located in Phenpo Lhundrup County, Lhasa Municipality, ‘TAR’. The monastery which housed around 120 monks reportedly has only 20 monks who are registered with the Religious Bureau. Earlier the monks were issued with five different political literatures to study; two additional literature were distributed in June 2005. The monks were notified that officials from the County Religious Bureau would arrive in the monastery in July 2005 to conduct examinations. Monks, above 18 years of age, were ordered to condemn the Dalai Lama as a “separatist,” and to pledge loyalty to the mainland China during the next visit of the officials. Upon learning the pre-requisites set by the authorities for enrollment in monastery, a large number of monks left the monastery voluntarily before the arrival of the officials. 

Continue Reading

to top