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The Chinese government has shut down Gangjong Sherig Norbu Lobling also known as Jigme Gyaltsen Nationalities Vocational School, a highly reputed and celebrated Tibetan private school with a history spanning three decades located in Golok (Ch: Guoluo) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. The forced closure of this highly renowned school signals the intensification of the Chinese government’s accelerated and systematic campaign to…

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The strict imposition on using the Tibetan language on Douyin, the most popular short video app in China—the Chinese counterpart of TikTok—has been a recurring issue and has raised concerns about digital freedoms and the rapidly shrinking space for cultural and linguistic autonomy in Chinese cyberspace.

The issue has sparked concerns again after a Tibetan netizen, Youga Ga, posted a video expressing strong discontent over the ban. Many Tibetans have also expressed their concerns on social media, reporting difficulties in streaming and speaking in Tibetan, with their content being immediately censored and deleted.

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This petition serves as a critical call to action for governments, civil society organisations, and individuals worldwide to hold China accountable for its systematic use of torture and other forms of inhuman treatment in Tibet.

By demanding accountability and transparency, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, alongside the Tibetan Youth Congress, Students for Free Tibet, and Tibetan Women’s Association, strives to seek justice for victims like Trulku Tenzin Delek, prevent future atrocities, and uphold the fundamental principles of human rights for all. Every signature represents a powerful statement supporting justice, dignity, and the rule of law.

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On the 37th anniversary of the entry into force of the United Nations Convention Against Torture, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, Tibetan Youth Congress, Students for Free Tibet and Tibetan Women’s Association solemnly commemorates and pays tribute to Tibetan human rights defenders, dissidents, and activists who have endured and continue to endure torture— the severest form of human rights abuse.

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On 11 June 2024, the UN made available the Chinese government’s announcement to accept or reject recommendations from the latest Universal Periodical Review (UPR) in January 2024, a process through which all UN member states’ human rights records are examined. In a disingenuous effort to paper over its refusal to engage to improve its appalling record, the Chinese government said it would accept 290 of the 428 recommendations, partially accept 8, note 32, and reject 98 of the recommendations made. The 290 accepted ones include those the government said it “accepted and being implemented” and those “accepted and already implemented.” 

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A notice issued by the Golok Prefecture Nyenbo Yurtse Nature Reserve Protection Management Bureau prohibits individuals and organisations from entering the sacred Nyenpo Yurtse in Sogru town, Chikdril (Ch: Jiuzhi) county, Golok (Ch: Guoluo) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture.

The five-point directive issued on 17 June bars both individuals and organisations from entering or conducting activities such as ecological experiences and natural education in the Nyenbo Yurtse area in Golok Prefecture without prior permission, emphasising that the authorities will strictly punish violators according to relevant laws if found guilty of not abiding by the directive. Additionally, the directive requires individuals to stop and report ‘unauthorised activities.’

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On the 29th anniversary of Tibetan spiritual leader Gedhun Choekyi Nyima’s enforced disappearance, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy strongly condemns the Chinese government’s continued failure to provide information on his whereabouts and reiterates our calls for the authorities to reveal the truth. Despite extensive efforts and calls from the global Tibetan community, international governments and the United Nations for more than two decades, the Chinese government has continued to ignore their calls leaving a deep void in the hearts of the Tibetans inside and outside Tibet. 

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In an interview with TCHRD, Namkyi, a 24-year-old former political prisoner, describes making the difficult decision to leave her family, and her daring escape across the border with her childhood friend Tsering Kyi, both of whom arrived in India last summer.

Despite the punitive measures imposed by Chinese authorities, it was the suffering of her loved ones that weighed heaviest on her conscience. Namkyi detailed the prevailing culture of fear and oppression, where dissent was stifled and discouraged, leaving individuals like herself isolated in the struggle for justice.

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The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy joins the international community in observing World Press Freedom Day, as proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993 to remind governments to honor their commitments to press freedom and its core principles. However, in Tibet, China’s stringent control over information severely curtails press freedom and suppresses expression. Through strict regulations on both foreign and domestic journalists, often resulting in imprisonment and torture, China obstructs international efforts to accurately understand the reality in Tibet. This suppression not only denies Tibetan voices agency but also forcefully suppresses independent publications through bans or extensive censorship.

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Chinese authorities have detained incommunicado a Tibetan monk, Pema, from the local Kirti Monastery in Ngaba (Ch: Aba) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province in the Tibetan province of Amdo for staging a peaceful solo protest against repressive policies while holding a portrait of the Dalai Lama on the stretch of a road known to the local Tibetans as ‘martyrs road’.

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