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TCHRD Statements

TCHRD Statement on International Human Rights Day 2017

Today, 10 December, is International Human Rights Day marking the adoption of Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), a set of principles that articulated for the first time the equal and inalienable entitlement of every human being to basic rights and fundamental freedoms and is considered the foundational document of international human rights legal system. The UDHR was drafted by representatives of various legal and cultural backgrounds including Chinese diplomat and philosopher Dr. Peng-chun Chang, who was also the vice-chair of the original UN Commission on Human Rights. To celebrate and reaffirm our commitment to this landmark document, the Tibetan …

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“Defending Rights Through Law”: Special Report on Tibet’s ‘Rights Defense’ Movement

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is pleased to announce the release of a special report on the eve of the 19th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, opening on 18 October 2017. The report delivers the history and current status of the ‘rights defense’ movement, known in Tibetan as “bsTun rgol khrims gtugs” (Eng: “Defending rights through law”), in Chinese and Tibetan language. On the verge of the commencement of the 19th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, we are presenting a campaign research paper on defending the rights through law. We urge the Chinese …

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Dissenting Voices Series: TCHRD releases Tibetan monk’s book that was banned by China

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is pleased to announce the release of “Fifty-four Days”, a book written by Tibetan monk named Lu Kunchok Gyatso, who lives in Tibet. The Tibetan language book is a collection of journal entries on the author’s dangerous journey over the Himalayas in the year 1994 to seek blessings from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and receive Tibetan monastic education in India. On his arrival in India after 54 days, he joined the Drepung monastery in south India and in 2000 returned to Tibet after completing his studies. He had completed the book …

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