The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) has published a special report titled ‘Chinese Transnational Repression of Tibetan Diaspora Communities’ today, on 6 February 2023, at the Press Club of India, New Delhi. While earlier reports from various organisations have addressed transnational repression impacting diverse ethnic groups, this report is the first comprehensive examination dedicated explicitly to the transnational repression experienced by the Tibetan diaspora communities.

Continue Reading

Tibetan human rights defender Tsering Tso was arbitrarily detained for the second time in three years due to her outspoken social media posts condemning Chinese authorities for engaging in racially discriminatory practices and human rights violations against Tibetans in Kyegudo (Ch: Yushu) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province, in the Tibetan province of Kham.

The Yushu Public Security Bureau (PSB) sentenced Tso to 15 days of “administrative detention,” imprisoning her in the Yushu city detention centre from 26 October to 10 November 2023.

Continue Reading

​The situation of Tibetan refugees in Nepal has worsened over the years. Since 1995, escalating Chinese pressure has hindered Nepal from issuing documentation to Tibetan refugees, depriving them of fundamental human rights, including travel, employment, and education rights.​ Referred to by many Tibetans as the “second Tibet,” Nepal now faces a level of repression second only to Tibet under Chinese occupation. Chinese-directed surveillance and espionage carried out in collaboration with Nepali authorities further restrict Tibetans’ freedom of expression and association, hindering cultural and religious practices.

Continue Reading

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is deeply honoured and privileged to release a new book by the critically acclaimed Tibetan author Naktsang Nulo, known for his unique voice and perspective on life in Tibet under Chinese occupation.

Titled ‘Naktsang’s Embarrassing Youth’ (Tib: Naktsang Shonue Rangtsang), the book continues the story of the author’s life as told in his first autobiography, ‘Naktsang Son’s Bittersweet Life’ (Naktsang Shilue Kyiduk), the English translation of which was published by the Duke University Press in 2014.

Continue Reading

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD), in conjunction with the Seoul-based Asian Dignity Initiative (ADI), released a special report on the Tibetan human rights situation in Nepal titled, ‘Languishing in Limbo: Tibetan Refugees in Nepal.’ The special report highlights the pronounced influence of China in Nepal, prompting Tibetan refugees to label it as a “Second Tibet,” alluding to the fact that the degree of restrictions faced by Tibetans in Nepal is second only to Tibet.

Continue Reading

A Tibetan singer named Palden has been sentenced on an unknown date a few months after his detention earlier this year in Golog (Ch: Guoluo) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture,  Qinghai Province, in the Tibetan province of Amdo. 

While details on Palden’s imprisonment still remain vague, it has emerged that the singer was apprehended after he shared a patriotic Tibetan song on the Chinese social media platform KuaiShou. He was held in an undisclosed location for an extended period of time before getting sentenced on unknown charges. 

Continue Reading

To mark the 78th anniversary of the United Nations (UN) founding, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is releasing “Engaging with the Special Procedures”, a Tibetan guidebook on one of the most significant human rights mechanisms: the Special Procedures.

Part of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) framework, the Special Procedures constitute a vital cadre of independent human rights experts and working groups. As such, the mechanisms address a broad spectrum of thematic human rights issues, encompassing civil, cultural, economic, political, and social rights.

Continue Reading

Despite concerns about its human rights record, China secured its seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council with 154 votes, marking its sixth election to the Council. China’s repeated membership raises questions about the effectiveness of the UN’s human rights system and the need for reform in the election process, emphasising the importance of implementing a performance appraisal system to prevent habitual human rights offenders from participating in Council elections. The international community is urged to take action to ensure that the Council’s goals are not compromised and to support human rights advocates in China.

Continue Reading

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD), represented by the executive director, Ms Tenzin Dawa, and researcher, Mr Ngawang Lungtok, actively participated in the working sessions of the 54th Human Rights Council session. This participation included attending side events, delivering oral statements, and meetings with various diplomatic missions and NGO partners based in Geneva, Switzerland. 

Ms Dawa and Mr Lungtok also raised the issue of transnational repression employed by the Chinese government to silence activists and dissidents beyond its borders.

Additionally, the diplomatic briefings were convened with due consideration for the broader context of the upcoming UN Human Rights Council elections, in which participating states will exercise their right to vote, choosing 15 members from a pool of 47 available seats. China seeking re-election to the council is of particular concern primarily because it does not fulfil the membership criteria, in addition to its egregious human rights records. 

In light of these developments, on 27 September, researcher Mr Ngawang Lungtok delivered an oral statement on behalf of the Asian Dignity Initiative during the general debate under Item 4 on Human Rights Situations that Require the Council’s attention. The full text of the oral statement is appended herewith:

Continue Reading

On the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearance, The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy organised a panel discussion featuring three former political prisoners and a human rights researcher moderated by the Centre’s Tibetan researcher, Nyiwoe. The session started with an explanatory video delving into the experiences of Tibetans subjected to enforced disappearance. Subsequently, TCHRD’s executive director, Ms. Tenzin Dawa, underscored instances of enforced disappearance, citing significant cases like that of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, abducted after being recognised as the 11th Panchen Lama by the 14th Dalai Lama, and referencing UN experts’ concerns. The discussion commenced with former political prisoners succinctly sharing their grim experiences of torture and enforced disappearances. Mr. Gendun Rinchen recounted his arrest for disseminating human rights information as a tour guide, while Mr. Ngawang Woebar was arrested for protesting in Lhasa. Former prisoner Geshe Tsering Dorje described torture methods and the dire treatment of Tibetan prisoners, while Mr Wangden Kyab emphasised China’s ongoing violations of its constitution and international obligations.

Continue Reading

to top